SKQ Book Club

"I didn't save the book, the book saved me." - imaginary person who grabbed a book from the trash

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Anonymous asked: Someone should compile a list of all of the books Sara has recommended via SKQ reads.

There is one, and it is on the official Tegan and Sara website :)

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Okay… I think I may have figured out Sara’s interpretation of this book in her song “Not Tonight.”

The narrator, John, is in love with his sister, Franny, but other women keep asking him to sleep with them. John, however, is enamored with Franny, so he won’t sleep with the other women.

Maybe that’s what “Not Tonight” means. Maybe Sara was enamored with someone else while she kept getting advances from other people. She would tell them “not tonight,” so she could focus on her chief desire. (Disclaimer: I do not mean in any way that Sara was in love with Tegan. Just because the character in the novel is, doesn’t mean Sara actually felt that way too.)

Anywho, I still have to figure out the first part of the song. Possibly, since John has a longing for America, the whole “what will bring me home” lyric could represent some form of longing for a type of home that Sara had. 

More to come later
CR

Okay… I think I may have figured out Sara’s interpretation of this book in her song “Not Tonight.”

The narrator, John, is in love with his sister, Franny, but other women keep asking him to sleep with them. John, however, is enamored with Franny, so he won’t sleep with the other women.

Maybe that’s what “Not Tonight” means. Maybe Sara was enamored with someone else while she kept getting advances from other people. She would tell them “not tonight,” so she could focus on her chief desire. (Disclaimer: I do not mean in any way that Sara was in love with Tegan. Just because the character in the novel is, doesn’t mean Sara actually felt that way too.)

Anywho, I still have to figure out the first part of the song. Possibly, since John has a longing for America, the whole “what will bring me home” lyric could represent some form of longing for a type of home that Sara had.

More to come later
CR

Filed under sara quin sara reads skq reads tegan and sara the hotel new hampshire john irving book club

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averageloveaffair asked: I'm also currently reading The Hotel New Hampshire for the first time, i'm maybe like 3/4 of the way through it and I can't find the connection haha, inspiration is weird right! It is very strange but I've really really enjoyed it!

Strange doesn’t begin to cover it!
I’m glad you’ve been enjoying the read. John Irving also wrote A Widow for One Year which is supposedly one of Sara’s favorite books.

Thanks for submitting an ask :)

9 notes

Heads up… this post might be boring for some of you.

In grammar there is something called “breath units” (I just learned about them, so keep in mind I am no pro). As far as I know, they are pretty much breaks/pauses in a sentence. These pauses occur where there’s punctuation and when readers mentally pause themselves. 

So, for example, let’s look at one of the quotes I posted from My Education:

Page 259 -  “Grief not for him, nor for Martha exactly, but for all my lost selves, which I liked to imagine were still somehow there, waiting for my return. But those selves were long gone. I would never be younger again. This was so simple it went without saying, but unsaid, one could try to forget it.” 

In this example there are 10 breath units. Why does that matter? Well, in grammar, each breath unit is supposed to have less than 25 syllables (why I first heard this, I thought it was bullshit - much like the rule that you can’t place a coordinating conjunction at the beginning of a sentence… because you can).
The average syllable per breath unit in this example is 7.1. So… why do syllables matter? It matters because if all breath units have the same syllable count, then the writing would be too boring. If the syllable count was low, then writing would be too abrupt. In turn, if the syllable count is too high then the writing can be too complex and confusing. 

Anyhwo, I think all this (despite its boring appearance) is actually pretty cool, because when I was wondering why Choi is such an excellent writer, this came up as a possible explaination:
Her writing is excellent, because she is able to navigate where to put appropriate pauses in her writing 1) for emphais 2) for clarity… and so forth. 

Reading is fun just for the hell of it, but it is also cool to learn the “tricks of the trade.” For those of you who want to be writers yourselves, this might be something you want to look into to better your writing. If you master breath units, like Choi, your writing can be an amazing rhythmic feat. 

Hope I didn’t put any of you to sleep ;)
CR

Heads up… this post might be boring for some of you.

In grammar there is something called “breath units” (I just learned about them, so keep in mind I am no pro). As far as I know, they are pretty much breaks/pauses in a sentence. These pauses occur where there’s punctuation and when readers mentally pause themselves.

So, for example, let’s look at one of the quotes I posted from My Education:

Page 259 - “Grief not for him, nor for Martha exactly, but for all my lost selves, which I liked to imagine were still somehow there, waiting for my return. But those selves were long gone. I would never be younger again. This was so simple it went without saying, but unsaid, one could try to forget it.”

In this example there are 10 breath units. Why does that matter? Well, in grammar, each breath unit is supposed to have less than 25 syllables (why I first heard this, I thought it was bullshit - much like the rule that you can’t place a coordinating conjunction at the beginning of a sentence… because you can).
The average syllable per breath unit in this example is 7.1. So… why do syllables matter? It matters because if all breath units have the same syllable count, then the writing would be too boring. If the syllable count was low, then writing would be too abrupt. In turn, if the syllable count is too high then the writing can be too complex and confusing.

Anyhwo, I think all this (despite its boring appearance) is actually pretty cool, because when I was wondering why Choi is such an excellent writer, this came up as a possible explaination:
Her writing is excellent, because she is able to navigate where to put appropriate pauses in her writing 1) for emphais 2) for clarity… and so forth.

Reading is fun just for the hell of it, but it is also cool to learn the “tricks of the trade.” For those of you who want to be writers yourselves, this might be something you want to look into to better your writing. If you master breath units, like Choi, your writing can be an amazing rhythmic feat.

Hope I didn’t put any of you to sleep ;)
CR

Filed under sara reads skq book club my education susan choi tegan and sara sara quin book club breath units grammar writing

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I have a Word document consisting of 4 pages of vocabulary words that I enjoyed reading and/or learning in My Education. So I won’t bore you, here are just a few of my favorite/I think people should know vocab. words:

Eke (for those that like to play 3 lettered words on Scrabble): manage to support oneself or make a living with difficulty, obtain/create just barely 

Hedonism (I come across this word frequently in my reading, so I thought I would put it here for those who don’t know the meaning): self-indulgence (for pleasure)

Interlocutor (also a word people should know): a person who takes part in a dialogue

Niggle (c’mon… niggle… just say it…): annoy 

Octogenarian (who doesn’t love multisyllabic words): a person who is from 80-89 years old

Susurrus (onomatopoeia?): whispering

Unstinting: free (giving without restraint) 

Badinage (something we could say in place of banter - Tegan and Sara Badinage): humourous or witty conversation 



There are more (that I sadly forgot to write down) but here are some of my favorite quotes (keep in mind some are better within the context):

207 “I felt exalted by a new, exotic sadness, as if some rite of passage were complete.” 

259 “Grief not for him, nor for Martha exactly, but for all my lost selves, which I liked to imagine were still somehow there, waiting for my return. But those selves were long gone. I would never be younger again. This was so simple it went without saying, but unsaid, on could try to forget it.” 

264 “Joachim is still subsumed in familiar aloneness, an aloneness made safe by routine.”

I have a Word document consisting of 4 pages of vocabulary words that I enjoyed reading and/or learning in My Education. So I won’t bore you, here are just a few of my favorite/I think people should know vocab. words:

Eke (for those that like to play 3 lettered words on Scrabble): manage to support oneself or make a living with difficulty, obtain/create just barely

Hedonism (I come across this word frequently in my reading, so I thought I would put it here for those who don’t know the meaning): self-indulgence (for pleasure)

Interlocutor (also a word people should know): a person who takes part in a dialogue

Niggle (c’mon… niggle… just say it…): annoy

Octogenarian (who doesn’t love multisyllabic words): a person who is from 80-89 years old

Susurrus (onomatopoeia?): whispering

Unstinting: free (giving without restraint)

Badinage (something we could say in place of banter - Tegan and Sara Badinage): humourous or witty conversation

There are more (that I sadly forgot to write down) but here are some of my favorite quotes (keep in mind some are better within the context):

207 “I felt exalted by a new, exotic sadness, as if some rite of passage were complete.”

259 “Grief not for him, nor for Martha exactly, but for all my lost selves, which I liked to imagine were still somehow there, waiting for my return. But those selves were long gone. I would never be younger again. This was so simple it went without saying, but unsaid, on could try to forget it.”

264 “Joachim is still subsumed in familiar aloneness, an aloneness made safe by routine.”

Filed under sara reads skq reads sara quin skqbookclub tegan and sara susan choi my education

3 notes

For those of you interested… My Education is possibly inspiration to the song “Goodbye, Goodbye” (or perhaps just the title). 

On page 75 of the Penguin paperback version of My Education is the following quote:
“Goodbye, goodbye, tolled in my mind, not because I sympathized with the annual rite, the completion of toil and attainment of credentialed enlightenment; nor because I saw myself commencing, in the terms of the familiar metaphor, a new course of education.” 

Pretty cool, huh? This quote also exemplifies Choi’s talent in writing. On the back of the book is a review by The Washington Post Book World that states, “… few other writers alive today make their sentences work so hard.” I completely agree! 

As “promised,” later today I will be posting some of my favorite vocabulary words found in My Education as well as some quotes. 

Happy Friday!

For those of you interested… My Education is possibly inspiration to the song “Goodbye, Goodbye” (or perhaps just the title).

On page 75 of the Penguin paperback version of My Education is the following quote:
“Goodbye, goodbye, tolled in my mind, not because I sympathized with the annual rite, the completion of toil and attainment of credentialed enlightenment; nor because I saw myself commencing, in the terms of the familiar metaphor, a new course of education.”

Pretty cool, huh? This quote also exemplifies Choi’s talent in writing. On the back of the book is a review by The Washington Post Book World that states, “… few other writers alive today make their sentences work so hard.” I completely agree!

As “promised,” later today I will be posting some of my favorite vocabulary words found in My Education as well as some quotes.

Happy Friday!

Filed under sara reads skq reads sara quin tegan and sara book club susan choi my education

11 notes

Because of Sara’s raving about this novel, I have choosen it as my first Sara Reads in a long time. 
I have to say, I absolutely love it. The story is phenomenal, and it barely takes you a second in order to be hooked on the novel. 
One of my favorite things about this book is the vocabulary to be found in it. Once I am done with it, I will post some of my favorite words (and quotes).

Because of Sara’s raving about this novel, I have choosen it as my first Sara Reads in a long time.
I have to say, I absolutely love it. The story is phenomenal, and it barely takes you a second in order to be hooked on the novel.
One of my favorite things about this book is the vocabulary to be found in it. Once I am done with it, I will post some of my favorite words (and quotes).

Filed under skq reads sara quin my education susan choi book club tegan and sara sara reads